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Library Teacher

  • Credits:
    32
  • Degree:
    Master of Education

Program Description

The Library Teacher Program prepares candidates who are committed to improving student learning and providing exceptional school library programs that engage students and teachers in the development of information, media, and technology skills, as well as life-long learning. Twenty-first century school libraries provide learning environments that ensure students and employees are effective, ethical, and creative users of ideas and information. By working with teachers to plan, mediate, and assess student learning, library teachers play a crucial role in expanding on and delving into lessons given in the classroom using a variety of resources and specialized skills they have available. Graduates are career-ready, technologically savvy, and culturally competent to advance social justice causes.

This program is for certification by the Puerto Rico Department of Education. Prior valid Puerto Rico teacher certification in another area required.
 
Non-Certification option: All program components are required, except for the practicum, practicum seminar, and the PCMAS.

 

Learning Outcomes

Our Library Teacher Program candidates are prepared to develop and promote quality school library programs. They understand and use multiple technologies for individual and group learning, empowering students to be critical thinkers, enthusiastic readers, researchers, and ethical users of information. They understand the history and the present role of school libraries in education and learning. They are ready to assume a leadership role in education and information literary, technology skills, and media literacy. They work in collaboration with other educators to promote a love of learning and reading, ensuring equal access to information resources, and to develop the knowledge and skills needed to stimulate and integrate quality reading and analysis skills in classrooms, laboratories, and libraries. Learning is personalized through independent projects that help to prepare the educator for the profession.

Careers

Graduates choose from a number of library/technology-related careers, including school library teachers, technology and information center directors, and media literacy consultants, library technicians, assistant librarians, publicity assistants, education program vendors, and information services.

 

For more information, please contact Admissions at 1-800-829-4723.

Curriculum

This program is for certification by the Puerto Rico Department of Education. Prior valid Puerto Rico teacher certification in another area required.
 
Non-Certification option: All program components are required, except for the practicum, practicum seminar, and the PCMAS.
 
All courses are taught in Spanish.

Required Courses
24
Credits
Overview of the School Library Program
ELM 509 3 credit(s)
The course introduces the vision, mission and role of the 21st century school library program in the teaching and learning process. It also examines the library teacher’s anticipated roles and responsibilities as: teacher, information specialist, instructional partner with classroom teachers, and program manager. Emphasis is on the evolution of school library programs; the development of school library policies; the teaching of literacy, particularly information, media and technology literacy; collaboration strategies with teachers, community agencies and the public library; evaluation of the program and services. Other topics include: access to resources, facility design, budget, equity, ethics, needs assessment, strategic planning and advocacy to ensure a quality program. Pre-practicum hours of directed field-based training required.
New Technologies in the School Library
ELM 532 3 credit(s)
This hands-on course explores the role of technology in the teaching and learning process, particularly the ways technology can help teachers and students communicate and collaborate and become good consumers, contributors, and creators in a digital age. Topics include: access to online databases, educational use of the Internet, copyright and ethical issues, major issues in media literacy, and the role of the library teacher as a technology leader. Pre-practicum hours of directed field-based training required.
Reference Resources
ELM 521 3 credit(s)
The course provides skills and knowledge needed to search and manage reference collection resources in print, digital, subscription and online web format that support the curriculum and the needs of diverse students and staff in a K-12 school environment. Library teacher candidates learn to evaluate and use text-based and electronic reference resources that support curriculum based learning projects. They also become familiar with numerous print and digital as well as government and community resources. The reference interview and information skills instruction methods are also considered.
Information Literacy
ELM 533 3 credit(s)
The course focuses on the integration of information literacy standards into the school library program and the teaching of information literacy skills, their theoretical foundations, and the strategies to teach these skills to K-12 library users. The library teacher candidate examines instructional design and strategies, national and state information literacy standards and skills, exemplary information search models, and learner assessment methods. Pre-practicum hours of directed field-based training required.
Literature for Young Adults
ELM 517 3 credit(s)
This survey course introduces classic and contemporary literature considered appropriate for young adults, that bridges the gap between children’s and adult books. It provides educators with the knowledge and skills needed to integrate young adult literature into classrooms and libraries. Thematic approaches are explored along with practical activities to promote lifelong reading, writing and appreciation of literature. Critical review sources and selection tools are also examined along with the standards and systems for the creation and maintenance of records.
Evaluation, Selection and Management of Learning Resources
ELM 515 3 credit(s)
The course examines the collection development process, policies and procedures for the acquisition and maintenance of print, digital, online and government and community resources that support the teaching and learning process and best meet the needs of all learners, including English language learners. Emphasis is on organization of the collection including: the standards and systems for the creation and maintenance of records, the classification system, subject headings, bibliographic/authority control; MARC21, the components of automated library systems. Additional topics covered are: professional library selection tools; collection evaluation; identification of user needs; the relationship between the curriculum and the collection; cooperative collection development with faculty and the public library; funding; intellectual freedom; equity of access. Pre-practicum hours of directed field-based training required.
Production of Instructional Materials
ELM 561 3 credit(s)
This hands-on course introduces multimedia technology and its instructional uses in designing authentic learning environments. Library teacher candidates gain experience creating multimedia projects for classrooms, school libraries, colleagues and students. They examine a variety of Web 2.0 tools, presentation software and tools for teaching. Basic production vocabulary and concepts of media literacy are also studied.
Children’s Literature
ELM 523 3 credit(s)
The course enhances and extends students’ knowledge of literature for children through in-depth involvement with books. The course focuses on selection, evaluation, and methods of sharing and discussing various types of literature, using print and other media. Students read widely from a broad range of literature and develop methods of incorporating literature into classroom and library experiences. Critical review sources and selection tools are also examined along with the standards and systems for the creation and maintenance of records.
Elective Courses
3 or 6
Credits

Three credits for certification candidates (especially EAD600); six credits for non-certification students.

The following elective courses are recommended.

Advanced Technologies in Education for Puerto Rico Administration - 3 credits
EAD 600 3 credit(s)

This course introduces students to actual and potential ways in which technology is used in school through a combination of practice-based theory and hands-on technology applications. Students will learn to evaluate the technology needs of their school or work organization, to plan for those needs, and to evaluate the success of technology programs. From a theoretical perspective, it focuses on using new technologies to serve various pedagogical philosophies and the impact of new technologies on instructional design, teaching and school reform.

Assistive Technology: Modifying the Curriculum for Diverse Learners
ESP 615 3 credit(s)
How do we as educators implement the mandated requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act that calls for assistive technology to be considered in each Individualized Education Program (IEP)? Candidates examine assistive technologies and the federal laws impacting the education of students with disabilities and investigate assistive technologies addressing seating and positioning, access to the technology, augmentative and alternative communication (low-tech and high-tech). Candidates examine curriculum modifications using technology, and software that addresses these modifications and individual learning styles. The course provides a comprehensive understanding of the various augmentative and alternative communications (AAC) methodologies, including the appropriate use of aids and devices. Course assignments connect assistive technologies to classroom practice.
Practicum & Seminar (licensure students only)
5
Credits

Prerequisites for Practicum

  • Pass all teacher certification tests required by DEPR for this license.
  • Pass all required courses.

In a school library, divided into two 150-hour experiences at two of the three school levels (elementary, middle, high school).

Guided and evaluated by a library teacher and a Cambridge College supervisor.

Practicum locations are subject to the regulations and must be approved by the program director. Students are responsible to discuss options for the practicum with the program director or regional center director.

Practicum: Library Teacher K-12 (300 Hours)
ELM 790 3 credit(s)
Prerequisites: Pre-practicum, pass all initial licensure courses, pass all teacher tests required by Massachusetts for this license. 300 hours in a school library; divided into two 150 hour experiences at two of the three school levels (elementary, middle, high school). Practicum Seminar required concurrently. The Practicum experience is in the role and at the level of the license sought, guided and evaluated by a professional licensed/certified library teacher and a Cambridge College supervisor. Practicum locations are subject to MA DESE regulations and must be approved by the program chair. Students are responsible for discussing options for practicum with the program chair. The Practicum experience provides library teacher candidates the opportunity to gain insights into the profession and to master the current Professional Standards for Library Teachers. Students reflect on their own professional growth and examine theory through actual practice. Exit Performance Portfolio required for credit.
Practicum Seminar: Library Teacher
ELM 791 2 credit(s)
Practicum ELM790 required concurrently. The seminar for classroom experience supports students’ growth as they assume the library teacher’s role. It is the setting for students to interpret their field-based experiences and transform them into skills, knowledge constructs, attitudes and values. The seminar provides a cohort/support for students to address problems and find solutions, while utilizing current academic research and practices. They master understanding and practice of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks, develop the skills necessary for the teacher tests, and become familiar with the current reforms and changes in state regulations on educator licensure. Exit Performance Portfolio required for credit.

Core Faculty

Senior Instructor

Pages

Admissions

  • Admission Test:

    No standardized graduate school tests required for admission into non-licensure programs.

  • Admissions Office:
    1-800-829-4723
  • Application Form:
  • Application Fee:
    $50, nonrefundable ($100 for international students; $100 for EdD)

Program Requirements

Prior valid Puerto Rico teacher certification in another area required.

School Requirements

See Admissions Requirements for School of Education

 

State Health Requirements

The Massachusetts Health Department and Cambridge College require the following of students in Massachusetts:

Immunizations – All students in Massachusetts are required to get certain immunizations before you can register for your first term. See form

Health Insurance – In Massachusetts, undergraduate students taking nine or more credits/term and graduate students taking six or more credits/term must enroll in the College’s health insurance plan. Students who have insurance with comparable coverage may request a waiver. See information and enroll or waive.

International Students 

International students are accepted at Massachusetts location only, and need to provide supplemental documentation:

  • Official demonstration of English language proficiency
  • Supplemental documentation for issuance of I-20
  • International transcripts, evaluated by an accepted evaluation service

Transfer Credit

Graduate program applicants, please complete the transfer credit request form if you wish to have prior course work evaluated for transfer. Learn more.

Undergraduate program applicants, once you are accepted, your official transcripts are evaluated for transfer credit.

 

Tuition

  • Credits:
    32
  • Cost per credit hour:
    $554
  • Application Fee:
    $50, nonrefundable ($100 for international students; $100 for EdD)
  • Health Insurance Fee:
    $3,415 - Required for Massachusetts students only. See waiver details on Tuition & Fees page.

Note: Rates are as of September 2018, and are subject to change without notice. Rates apply to all students, unless otherwise noted.

Financial Aid

Cambridge College offers financial aid to students in our degree programs who are enrolled at least half time. Undergraduate students must be enrolled in at least 6 credits each term. Graduate and doctoral students must be enrolled in at least 4 credits each term. Learn more

Grants, Scholarships and Loans

Cambridge College welcomes the opportunity to support your efforts to pay for college.  Federal, state and local resources in the form of grants, scholarships, loans and work-study, including Cambridge College Scholarships, are available to help defray the cost of tuition. Learn more

Getting Your Company to Help

Many companies have tuition assistance programs, designed to help their employees with their professional development. Learn more