Teaching Social Justice

  • Credits: 32
  • Degree:
    Masters of Education

Program Description

The Teaching Social Justice program is based on the recognition that education is critical to creating a more just and sustainable world. Education is approached as a transformational, liberating force for educators, social change agents, and students. 

Diverse written and visual texts from around the world are used to address systemic structures that lead to domination and oppression. Alternative world views that can serve as a foundation for building just communities are explored. 

Extensive reading, writing, research, and oral assignments, intensive classroom discussion and distance learning provide meaningful learning opportunities.

 

Learning Outcomes

Students come to understand the last 500 years of historical, geographical, political, religious and other legacies that have created the current injustices in America and the world, and they interrogate systemic injustice. Students appreciate the richness of diverse cultures and the complexities of human development and identity formation. They develop a heightened interdisciplinary sense of global interconnections. They critically measure personal belief systems vis-a-vis scholarly literature and understand multiple diverse and global perspectives.

They learn to design educational courses or organizational plans of action from an interdisciplinary approach and social justice perspective, to promote social, political, educational, ecological, and economic justice. They are able to engage in leadership actions to sustain, restore, and preserve communities and the environment.

Their research project and presentation can support their postgraduate endeavors. They participate competently in a supportive professional network, becoming change agents at their places of employment and in their communities.

Careers

Our graduates pursue a wide variety of jobs that involve a significant element of educating. They are tutors and teachers; personal, academic, and athletic coaches; actors; family advocates and mediators; clergy; college faculty and administrators; and more. They work in schools and colleges, nonprofit organizations and human services, the criminal justice system; religious organizations, community planning and development, and corporations.

Program Chair

Diane Harper
diane.harper@cambridgecollege.edu

Curriculum


Professional Seminar and Project
9
Credits
Professional Seminar I
EUE 691 2 credit(s)
Contact us for more information.
Professional Seminar II
EUE 692 2 credit(s)
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Professional Seminar III
EUE 693 2 credit(s)
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Independent Learning Project:
EUE 800 3 credit(s)
Contact us for more information.
Teaching Social Justice Required Courses
14
Credits
Rereading Global Oppression: The Last 500 Years
EED 636 3 credit(s)
This course examines, from a systems perspective, the last 500 years of socio-political, psychological, cross-cultural, educational, religious, and economic dimensions of various world atrocities that have led to and continue to sustain current oppression of diverse peoples across the globe. It is designed to prepare learners to be knowledgeable about and to challenge individual, group, and institutional biases and how these contribute to discrimination and oppression. Equally important, this course will examine the adaptive strategies and strengths of oppressed/marginalized groups and will assist students in undrstanding the complex nature of their own personal values, beliefs, and behaviors that may limit their ability to practice effective methodologies in their schools, communities, and areas of work. Students critically analyze both written and visual texts that include but are not limited to documentaries, film, poems, novels, essays, trade cards, advertisements, etc. This course is both reading and writing intensive; written and oral work challenge learners to move beyond reflecting on personal experience alone to identify and challenge contemporary systems of oppression.
Foundations of Social Justice
EED 617 3 credit(s)
What are the norms and values that characterize a socially just society? This course is designed to explore this question. We will examine justice under the follow contexts: theories of justice, principles and scope of social justice, why social justice matters, the machinery of social injustice, targeting injustices, identifying inequities on the basis of social group memberships, advocating for social justice, and teaching social justice. This course heightens awareness of contemporary social issues and helps learners develop action plans that foster action for socially just principles. We examine values, discuss social commitment, and develop critical thinking and social inquiry skills necessary for engaging in social justice action for social change.
Human Brain, Human Learning
EED 647 3 credit(s)
This introductory course in brain-compatible teaching and learning will entail a review of some of the latest research findings from the neurosciences, cognitive psychology, information science, psychobiology and neurolinguistic programming. The goal of this course is to provide educators and trainers with the opportunity to learn about the role of the brain / mind in the learning process so that they will be able to read and understand current brain / mind research and apply some of the findings to their teaching practice. Some time will also be spent on accelerated learning techniques. The course would be appropriate for educators of all grade levels and subject areas as well as for corporate trainers and other trainers of adult learners.
MultiCultural Diversity Issues in the Workplace and Classroom
EED 705 3 credit(s)
This course studies (1) ethnic-cultural history, (2) prejudice, biases and value systems, and (3) the appreciation of diversity in professional skills and personal strengths. Students discuss teaching cultural diversity in various learning environments, and individuals’ power in realizing differences and similarities. Students explore ethnicity, race, gender and class from an historical and contemporary perspectives. The class looks at teaching styles and ways to manage culturally diverse classrooms. The importance of building students’ self-esteem and sensitivity to their varied learning styles are addressed. Students should come prepared with a brief overview of their ethnic/cultural history (e.g., photo albums, letters, journals, and family trees).
Theory and Practice of Education Reflective Practice for Educators
EED 590G 1 credit(s)
This one-credit course is designed to help teachers improve their classroom practices through daily reflections on their work. By developing a greater level of self-awareness about the nature and impact of their performance, it is anticipated that they will understand the how and why of what they do as they teach, manage their classrooms, and develop curriculum. This will enable them to gather information about their professional practices and take major steps to improve their teaching.
Theory and Practice of Education Reflective Practice for Educators
EED 591G 1 credit(s)
This one-credit course is designed to help teachers improve their classroom practices through daily reflections on their work. By developing a greater level of self-awareness about the nature and impact of their performance, it is anticipated that they will understand the how and why of what they do as they teach, manage their classrooms, and develop curriculum. This will enable them to gather information about their professional practices and take major steps to improve their teaching.
Electives
9
Credits

Choose one elective in education, and choose two of the courses listed below.

EED 663 Teaching Social Studies: the United States Through the Media - additional elective to be added to list below.

Images and Information: An African American Woman's Notebook
EED 584 3 credit(s)
Literature-based curriculum can develop a student’s critical reading and writing skills using entire novels as a method of discovery and a source of information. This course will explore novels written by African American women from autobiographical, historical, and cultural perspectives unique to the Black woman’s experience. These novels trace the lives of contemporary African American women who made their marks on society.
America Through Its Literatures
EED 680 3 credit(s)
This intensive survey course explores literary depictions of America (the United States) through literature. The texts may include short stories, poems, plays, books, film, music, advertising, television, political speeches, and comic strips. The class develops pedagogical strategies to introduce students to mythologies, dystopias, deconstruction, hauntologies, plimpsests, panopticism, hybridity, colonial and post colonial debates, and the ways in which authors create parallel universes to comment on the America we now inhabit. Students become aware of other Americas that exist in parallel with our own, realities from which many of our students come.
Visualizing Social Justirce
EED 681 3 credit(s)
This intensive course explores the different ways that artists of different persuasions have treated the subject of social justice both at present and in the past. The term “visualizing” is meant to include all of the arts (i.e. the “visual arts,” drama, dance, literature and poetry, music, etc.). The class develops pedagogical strategies to introduce students to methodologies and philosophical vehicles and to integrate such methods into their own curriculum.

Core Faculty

Senior Instructor

Pages

Admissions

  • Admission Test:

    Passing grade on TOEFL (English language proficiency test) is required for international students.

  • Admissions Office:
    1-800-829-4723
  • Application:
  • Application Fee:
    $50, nonrefundable ($100 for international students; $100 for EdD)

General Requirements

Official Transcript
Two Completed Recommendation Forms
Current Résumé

Personal Statement

Learn more about General Requirements 

State Requirements

College students are required to comply with state laws regarding individual health insurance and immunization. Compliance requirements currently exist for students in Massachusetts, Virginia and Tennessee. Learn more

International Students – Additional Requirements

International Students will need to complete supplemental documentation when applying. International transcripts must also be translated prior to submission in order to be evaluated for applicability. Learn more about international student requirements.

Transfer Credit Request Form

Only needed if you wish to have prior course work evaluated for transfer credit. Learn more about transferring credits.

 

Tuition

  • Credits:
    32
  • Cost per credit hour:
    $485
  • Application Fee:
    $50, nonrefundable ($100 for international students; $100 for EdD)
  • Graduation Fee:
    $110 (charged in last term)
  • Health Insurance Fee:
    $1,497 - Required for Massachusetts students only. See waiver details on Tuition & Fees page.

Note: Rates are as of September 2013, and are subject to change without notice. Rates apply to all students, unless otherwise noted.

Financial Aid

Cambridge College offers financial aid to students in our degree programs who are enrolled at least half time. Undergraduate students must be enrolled in at least 6 credits each term. Graduate and doctoral students must be enrolled in at least 4 credits each term. Learn more

Grants, Scholarships and Loans

Cambridge College welcomes the opportunity to support your efforts to pay for college.  Federal, state and local resources in the form of grants, scholarships, loans and work-study, including Cambridge College Scholarships, are available to help defray the cost of tuition. Learn more

Getting Your Company to Help

Many companies have tuition assistance programs, designed to help their employees with their professional development. Learn more