Special Education - Non Licensure

  • Credits: 36
  • Degree:
    Master of Education

Program Description

The Teacher of Students With Moderate Disabilities program prepares special education teachers and leaders to be caring and competent, with the essential and critical skills to understand the use of diverse curriculum design and development.  This program is designed in conjunction with the Puerto Rico Department of Edcuation guidelines and is only offered in Puerto Rico.

Learning Outcomes

Graduates demonstrate the knowledge, skills and values necessary to enable their students to excel academically and socially. They understand how moderate disabilities affect progress in learning academic content of the general curriculum that their non-disabled peers learn. They understand their responsibility to provide strategies for their students to access the regular education curriculum.

Careers

Students who complete this program will be eligible to teach special education students in Puerto Rico.

Program Chair

Mary L. Garrity
mary.garrity@cambridgecollege.edu

Curriculum


Professional Seminar and Project
9
Credits

 

Professional Seminar I: Special Education (Initial)
ESP 691N 2 credit(s)
The Professional Seminar is a signature element of the adult learning model at Cambridge College. It grounds learning in a cohort group of students with a faculty leader licensed in moderate needs special education. This seminar leader is the students’ academic advisor and guides them through their graduate program. The cohort studies professional standards for special needs teachers, and the requirements for state licensure as a Teacher of Students with Moderate Disabilities - Prek-8 and 5-12 The cohort studies professional standards for special needs teachers, and the requirements for state licensure in moderate special needs - Prek-8, 5-12. Students integrate their learning from classes, workshops, and field experience. Transformed by the resulting knowledge, competencies, attitudes and values, students become reflective practitioners and lifelong learners. The seminar also supports students’ work on their independent learning projects, from identifying topics, to guiding the research and writing, to completion. The seminar leader approves the finished projects.
Professional Seminar II: Special Education (Initial)
ESP 692N 2 credit(s)
Professional Seminar III: Special Education
ESP 693 2 credit(s)
Additional term of professional seminar that may be required depending on student’s experience and progress.
Independent Learning Project: Special Education
ESP 800 3 credit(s)
The Independent Learning Project is a culminating learning experience that helps educators integrate their personal and formal learning and their professional experiences into a meaningful whole. It reflects the general guidelines for teachers of students with moderate dis- abilities and articulates the individual’s educational and administrative philosophy. The project is research and action-based, on a focused topic chosen by the educator, within the area of licensure. It engages educators in sustained research into educational practice and cur- riculum development; parts of the project may be implemented during the practicum.
Special Education Courses
27
Credits
Inclusion and Classroom Behavior Management
ESP 512 3 credit(s)
In this course students learn the basic components of an effective inclusionary program. In addition, they understand the etiology of learning problems and strategies to remediate these problems. They learn how to fully include these students in the regular classroom. Emphasis is on learning behavior management skills that are effective with both regular and special education students. Pre-practicum hours of directed field-based training required.
Psycho-Educational Assessment for Teaching Exceptional Students
ESP 607 3 credit(s)
Pre-practicum: 10 hours required: directed field-based training. This course increases educators’ ability to assess various educational test instruments, understand outcome data, analyze various data sets and make hypotheses, and formulate academic goals and objectives. Educators develop a conceptual framework in which to understand their students’ academic needs and develop appropriate interventions based upon testing outcome data. A general understanding of statistics, ethics, and test construction is introduced for evaluating various assessment instruments and the appropriateness of their use. Students utilize formal and informal assessments, standardized instrumentation, and screening instrumentation to gather data and formulate appropriate interventions and accommodations for various educational plans. Pre-practicum hours of directed field-based training required.
Theories of Typical and Atypical Human Development
ESP 689 3 credit(s)
This course examines current research and theoretical models that focus on typical and atypical development of children. Emphasis is on understanding children’s psychological, intellectual, and physical development. Piaget’s theory of cognitive development is examined along with more recent investigations and adaptations. Theories of the role of context (physical, social and cultural impacts on development) are compared. The course also investigates the impact of developmental theories on the education of children with disabilities. Formulation of developmentally appropriate Individual Educational Programs is discussed. Pre-practicum hours of directed field-based training required.
Laws and Regulations Pertaining to Special Education
ESP 695 3 credit(s)
This course will review all special education laws (IDEIA, 2004, and specific regulations such as 34 C.F.R. 300; 603 CMR 28:00) regarding the pre-referral and referral of a student, and the development of an Individual Education Plan (IEP). Additionally, the course will discuss the relevance of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA, 1990), the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), as well as the procedures for Special Education Appeals relating to public schools’ obligations to provide Free and Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) for students with disabilities. An additional emphasis in this course will be on students with a diagnosis of Autism and the process for developing IEP’s for these students in the Least Restrictive Environment (LRE), using theories and strategies for including students in general education classrooms. Special attention shall be paid to the particular state legislation governing special education. Pre-practicum hours of directed field-based training required.
Principles of Language Development; Bridging Differences and Disorders
ESP 662 3 credit(s)
This course develops a thorough understanding of how children acquire language and how language develops over the life span. Language acquisition is one of the most important domains within the sciences of the mind. Developments in cognitive neuroscience have made it evident that language, once acquired, is not static, but rather has constant neural reorganization. Students develop an overview of the course of language development, biological foundations for language, the major linguistic systems individuals must acquire, and finally the methods of study for language development. Theories of first and second language acquisition and development are introduced. Because there is no single process of language acquisition, students are exposed to different theories of semantic development, phonological development, morphological development and syntax. Students come to understand the relationship between language acquisition, language impairment, and treatments of children with communicative handicaps are also discussed. Pre-practicum hours of directed field-based training required.
Pedagogy in Reading and Spanish Language Arts
ESP 681 3 credit(s)
The course is designed to develop a thorough understanding of the Fundamental principles of Spanish/Language Arts, focusing on the interrelationship of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. The course focuses on the student as learner, and the processes involved in content reading and literacy. There is a direct correlation between the growing social and cultural diversity in today's classrooms and the tie to information on literacy. Since high levels of literacy are expected in today's contemporary society, children and families need to expand literacy activities to provide a range of options available to them in work and life. Diagnostic tools and classroom techniques for assessing, decoding, encoding, comprehension, literacy, and fluency skills are explored, along with related theories and research, and developmentally appropriate practices. The language arts are incomplete without making connections to all parts of the curriculum. Children require dynamic role models to emulate so that they are apprenticed into literate behavior. A variety of reading programs are discussed and researched, including philosophy, teaching techniques and materials. Information on how to plan and implement instruction in content area classrooms is included. Frameworks are provided for teaching and learning subject matter and planning lessons.
Assistive Technology: Modifying the Curriculum for Diverse Learners
ESP 615 3 credit(s)
How do we as educators implement the mandated requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act that calls for assistive technology to be considered in each Individualized Education Program (IEP)? Educators in this course examine assistive technologies and the federal laws affecting the education of students and children with disabilities. They look at assistive technologies addressing seating and positioning, access to the technology, augmentative and alternative communication (low-tech and high-tech). Educators will also look at curriculum modifications using technology, and software that addresses these modifications and individual learning styles. They will have a comprehensive understanding of the various augmentative and alternative communications (AAC) methodologies, including the appropriate use of aids and devises.
Teaching Numeric and Geometric Structures
MAT 623 3 credit(s)
This course covers the teaching pedagogy of the basic foundation of the mathematics curriculum in terms of its numerical and geometric structures. Major topics include: number sense, numeration, estimation, mental math, modeling operations using concrete objects, geometry, spatial sense and measurement. Pre-practicum hours of directed field-based training required.
Using Multiple Intell Accel Learn Teachg Eng Lang Arts Math Hist Sci
ESP 721 3 credit(s)
Special education teachers learn to apply multiple intelligence and accelerated learning instructional strategies in teaching to the content area standards. Teachers get an overview of Howard Gardner’s multiple intelligence theory and its implications. They also experience Lozanov’s accelerated learning structures and translation to brain-based teaching. Teachers learn to select, evaluate, and use teaching and assessment differentiation strategies to meet the needs of special education students in regular education classrooms. They design multiple intelligence and accelerated learning lessons to engage students in acquiring specific knowledge and skills.

Core Faculty

Senior Instructor

Pages

Admissions

  • Admission Test:

    Passing grade on TOEFL (English language proficiency test) is required for international students.

  • Admissions Office:
    1-800-829-4723
  • Application:
  • Application Fee:
    $50, nonrefundable ($100 for international students; $100 for EdD)

General Requirements

Official Transcript
Two Completed Recommendation Forms
Current Résumé

Personal Statement

Learn more about General Requirements 

State Requirements

College students are required to comply with state laws regarding individual health insurance and immunization. Compliance requirements currently exist for students in Massachusetts, Virginia and Tennessee. Learn more

International Students – Additional Requirements

International Students will need to complete supplemental documentation when applying. International transcripts must also be translated prior to submission in order to be evaluated for applicability. Learn more about international student requirements.

Transfer Credit Request Form

Only needed if you wish to have prior course work evaluated for transfer credit. Learn more about transferring credits.

 

Tuition

  • Credits:
    36
  • Cost per credit hour:
    $485
  • Application Fee:
    $50, nonrefundable ($100 for international students; $100 for EdD)
  • Graduation Fee:
    $110 (charged in last term)
  • Health Insurance Fee:
    $1,497 - Required for Massachusetts students only. See waiver details on Tuition & Fees page.

Note: Rates are as of September 2013, and are subject to change without notice. Rates apply to all students, unless otherwise noted.

Financial Aid

Cambridge College offers financial aid to students in our degree programs who are enrolled at least half time. Undergraduate students must be enrolled in at least 6 credits each term. Graduate and doctoral students must be enrolled in at least 4 credits each term. Learn more

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